Stress Antidote Parasympathetic Nervous System – Kundalini Yoga 17 Sept, 6.15pm @ Prana Lounge.

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Parasympathetic nervous system a stress antidote.

The parasympathetic nervous system is the calming half of the autonomic (i.e. automatic) nervous system. It is the ability to calmly see with awareness and find the solution even when you feel really challenged. It is the break peddle of the vehicle of your body. If allows you to deeply relax, rejuvenate and regenerate. The parasympathetic nervous system is ruled by sound, therefore that is why Gong or mantra is so powerful to stimulate it.

The sympathetic nervous system is your alarm, it is the alertness of being on edge It is governed by sight as opposed to sound. It is your gas pedal in the vehicle of your body. We overly use our sympathetic nervous system; we have not found the off button. In today’s stressful lives more than ever it produces chronic stress which affects our health. The over production of adrenaline and cortisol leads to auto immune dysfunctions such as:

  • Rheumatoid arthritis. …
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus). …
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). …
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS). …
  • Type 1 diabetes mellitus. …
  • Psoriasis.

Just to list a few. The wonderful thing is we have yogic tools and technologies that allow us to reduce the sympathetic nervous system response by stimulating the parasympathetic nervous system. A study reported by International Journal of Basic and Applied Medical Sciences ISSN: 2277-2103 (Online) An Online International Journal Available at http://www.cibtech.org/jms.htm 2011 Vol. 1 (1) September-December, pp.144-148/Kiran et al.concluded that , meditative lifestyle is specifically associated with better mental health scores. The autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity is affected by meditation. While comparing ANS activity of mediators and non mediators of each group separately, they concluded that there is an increase in parasympathetic activity, but the sympathetic activity was less in mediators.

Let’s practice sound healing and meditation on a daily basis to bring our autonomic nervous system back into balance. Sat nam Fi x sanasumainsrilanka.wordpress.com read our weekly blogs and brain candy updatesraymond.fiona@gmail.comwww.sanasuma.co.uk0778011984.

Mon 17 Sept 6.15-7.30pm   Kundalini Yoga @ Prana Lounge, 60 Horton Place, Col 7

Tues 18 Sept 9.45-10.45am Kundalini Yoga@ Om Shambala, 143 Fife Rd, Col 5

Tues 18 Sept 3.30-4.30pm Special Needs Kids@ Reach Beyond, Tickel Rd, Col8

Wed 19 Sept   5- 7.30am   Sadhana @ 145/5 Fife Rd, Col 5 (FREE CLASS)

Wed 19 Sept 6.45-8pm     KundaliniYoga @ 9 Greenlands Lane, Col 5

Mon 24 Sept 6.15-8pm     Full Moon Gong Bath@ Om Shambala, 143 Fife Rd, Col 5

Fri   28 Sept 9pm-8am     All night Gong Puja@ Prana Lounge, Col 7 (Early Bird 4500Rs)

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LA233 810512 activate the parasympathetic nervous system

General Position:

Sit in easy pose with a straight spine.

Arms and Hands:

With the elbow straight raise the right arm up in front of the body until it is parallel to the ground and the hand is in front of the shoulder. Bend the wrist back sharply so that the palm faces forward. Curl the ring and little fingers down into the palm and lock the thumb over them. Extend the index and middle fingers and spread them apart as much as possible. Bend the left elbow and bring the arm up in front of the body, grasping the right arm just above the elbow where the hand fits naturally. The thumb is hooked under the upper arm. The left forearm is parallel to the ground, perpendicular to right

Breath: arm. Breathe as necessary to whisper the mantra. At the end of the meditation inhale deeply and hold 30 seconds; exhale, immediately inhale again, hold 30 seconds; exhale and relax.

Eyes

Look at the tip of the nose.

Practice this mantra which will never give you any trouble. It Mantra:

Powerfully whisper the following mantra:

ARDAAS BHAEE AMAR DAAS GUROO

AMAR DAAS GUROO ARDAAS BHAEE

RAAM DAAS GUROO RAAM DAAS GUROO RAAM DAAS GUROO SACHEE SAHEE.

Length of time:

Practice this meditation for 11 minutes.

Comments: This meditation will activate the parasympathetic nervous system and the central vagus nerve. will save you from all darkness: mental, physical, spiritual past, present, and future.

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A Strong Nervous System means less Stress – Kundalini yoga 6.15pm Mon Sept 10@ Prana Lounge, Col 7

553967d4b499b312071c3d62066f0719A Strong Nervous System helps us Deal with Stress

Living our daily lives especially in the Age of Aquarius, juggling, work, family, friends and finances can be difficult at the best of times, but when challenges or crisis hits we can feel overwhelmed by pressure which can literally derail us and end up as STRESS.

How we respond consciously or unconsciously to our environment, people and situations all depends on the strength of our nervous system. The nervous system consists of three parts: Central Nervous System (sensation & motor control), Peripheral Nervous System (connects nerves to organs and limbs) and Autonomic Nervous System (emergency response: Sympathetic- “gas pedal” & Parasympathetic- “brake pedal”). Nerve impulses from these 3 different systems communicate with our glands, muscles and organs via electrical and chemical signals to sense and respond, or sense and react.

Some of the benefits to having a strong nervous system are that you can manage stress, respond less automatically and process sensations and emotions so they do not create patterns/habits in our sub and unconscious mind.

Have you ever looked away during a scary movie or if you see something painful? It feels like you cannot bare to watch what is about to happen, anticipating something bad? This is what a weak nervous system is like. A person cannot contain the reality of an event and therefore avoids it altogether. It is as if your container, the nervous system, does not have the depth or inner resources to deal with the painful or difficult events and this governs the limit of the amount of stress or pain that can be withstood. Your nerves get frayed and the thalamus (an area at the back of your brain) filters sensations and decides which thoughts and sensations make it to the conscious mind or which go unnoticed and are pushed into the unconscious mind. These thoughts left unprocessed end up in nervous disorders.

When you develop a strong nervous system, it allowsyouto experience an event no matter how painful. You cannot control what is happening, but you can control whether you allow yourself to experience reality.

A strong nervous system is like a deep well, it gives you the ability to hold whatever situation comes into your life. A strong nervous system can allow you to experience and process painful events faster, as you can ALLOW the experience without avoiding it, process the feelings and not get attached. It can also reflect in your depth in meditation. With a strong nervous system you can meditate for hours without distracting pain. When the nervous system develops the capacity to hold pain, then your mind can bring awareness to it and then release it.

We have become a society that seeks pleasure and avoids pain at all costs. I am not saying that we should seek out pain, but the reality of life is that there are good times and bad times, this is just the polarity of existence. By consciously avoiding the tough times you are running away from reality. We all do it on some level, but the truth is that avoiding pain causes neurosis. It is important to have a strong nervous system to be graceful during tough times.

anti stress yoga

Practical tips – What does this all mean?

Practice soothing the nervous system, through yoga and meditation. Yoga increases the energy moving through particular nerve pathways. Breath of fire is great for this. This is why sometimes you feel light headed when practicing this breath, because it has moved a block, now energy can flow along that nerve pathway releasing toxins and giving you renewed vitality, which creates that sensation of dizziness.

Yoga also works on stimulating the parasympathetic nervous system, your brake pedal in life, by increasing the parasympathetic response, so you do not get the feeling of being overwhelmed.You can ALLOW yourself to see the thought, or feel the emotion, bring conscious awareness to it and release it.

The neural pathways in people with chronic pain become hypersensitive so they feel pain much faster. Yoga decreases the pain sensation by increasing the amount of information travelling down a shared neural pathway, effectively diluting the pain information. This means you withstand more pain, once again bring conscious awareness to that area and heal it.

Meditation including mantra and eye focus actively stimulates the thalamus and changes how it deals with sensory information, once again allowing us to be in the moment without rejecting it.

Try meditation to “To Stabilize the State.” This meditation works with the armpits which Yogi Bhajan said, if the brain is the engine the armpits are the exhaust. By working the armpits, the connection to our central nervous system, we strengthen the whole nervous system.

Sat nam Fi x sanasumainsrilanka.wordpress.com read our weekly blogs and brain candy updatesraymond.fiona@gmail.comwww.sanasuma.co.uk0778011984.

Mon 10 Sept 6.15-7.30pm   Kundalini Yoga @ Prana Lounge, 60 Horton Place, Col 7

Tues 11 Sept 9.45-10.45am Kundalini Yoga@ Om Shambala, 143 Fife Rd, Col 5

Tues 11 Sept 3.30-4.30pm Special Needs Kids@ Reach Beyond, Tickel Rd, Col8

Wed 12 Sept   5- 7.30am   Sadhana @ 9 Greenlands Lane, Col 5 (FREE CLASS)

Wed 12 Sept 6.45-8pm     KundaliniYoga @ 9 Greenlands Lane, Col 5

Thurs 13 Sept 11.30-1pm Special Needs Kids@ Reach Beyond, Tickel Rd, Col8

Sun 16 Sept 10-11.30am Stress Management Workshop@ Sat Sangat, Negambo

Kundalini Yoga to Overcome Stress – 6.15pm 3 September @Prana Lounge,Col 7

tmb-yoga-teacher-fiona-raymond-1495605355Overcoming Stress?

The circumstances of our life our difficult to change but we Do get to choose our approach to the pressures of life. This is what we can learn to do for ourselves. Hans Selye, the Canadian physician, described stress as simply the body’s adaptation to change. It is how we respond whenever an internal or external event occurs.

Shanti Shanti Kaur says, “stress can be as simple as a shift in room temperature or as destabilizing as losing one’s job. Since change happens nearly every instant, we have a stress response nearly every instant. Stress is natural and necessary. Over time, we create our own individual stress response pattern through our thoughts and beliefs, our emotional responses, the way we breathe, and the way we hold and move our body. This pattern becomes set at a certain point, and although this response is intended to be helpful, more often than not our personal stress response pattern blocks the natural flow of ease in the body, and we become frequently sick, easily tired, often irritable, and generally “stressed out.” In each stress response, we draw on the capacity of the glandular and nervous systems, which in turn affects the sensitivity and vitality of the immune response. Where we hold tension and how quickly we release it forms our individual, personal stress response which determines what happens in our body, how much energy we have, how healthy we stay, and how we feel at the end of the day. One characteristic of a healthy stress response is to take action when action is needed and to pause, or rest internally, when it is not.

  1. What are the little everyday things that add to your stress levels? List them.
  2. What is a personal stress trigger that others might find inconsequential?

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Practical solutions -Yogic Breath

Your stress response is etched into your body. To start correcting it start with an exhalation. Continue to breathe consciously. Notice in your body where the breath comes easily, where it is restricted. Notice what part of your torso moves, and what does not. Notice where your breath stops and how deep it goes, both on the inhalation and on the exhalation. Throughout the day, notice your breathing pattern and where you hold tension in your body. Do you hold your breath when thinking? When listening? When performing certain tasks? Do you lift your shoulders or tighten your stomach? These are all part of your personal stress response pattern. Once you are aware of your patterns, you can interact with it, modify it, and make it work for you. Breath is our direct link to our subconscious, unconscious mind, mood, energy and spirit. On a physical level, it is the practice of the various yogic breathing techniques that strengthens the nervous system and balances the action of the glandular system. Since these two systems are key to the stress response, making them strong through proper breathing actually breaks previous patterns and forms a healthy stress response. By breathing from the navel point, we develop a deeper relationship with the core of the body, bringing greater confidence and calm. Sat nam x raymond.fiona@gmail.com   0778011984 www.sanasuma.co.uk  www.3ho.org

Mon 3 Sept 6.15-7.30pm     Kundalini Yoga @ Prana Lounge, Col 7

Mon 3 Sept 6-7pm      Kundalini Yoga Shaunagh @Om Shambala, 143 Fife Rd, Col 5 (FREE)

Tues 4 Sept 9.45-10.45am   Kundalini Yoga@ Om Shambala,143 Fife Rd, Col 5

Tues 4 Sept 6-7.15pm           Kundalini Yoga Class Shaunagh @ 145/5Fife Road, Col 5

Wed 5 Sept   5.00- 7.30am   Sadhana @ 145/5 Fife Rd, Col 5 (FREE)

Wed 5 Sept 6.45-8pm           Kundalini Yoga @ 9 Greenlands Lane, Col 5

Thurs 6 Sept 11-1pm        Special Needs Kids and teacher class @ Reach Beyond, Tickel Rd

Sat  8 Sept 4-5.30pm           Gong Bath @ Sri Yoga Shala, Thalpe, Galle